21 March, 2012

Home schooling at fourteen

I started home schooling when I was twelve, because I had graduated my old school and had no where left to go. We looked extensively at a catholic school, and were so serious about going that we even planned a day to go get my uniform.

Well, as fate would have it, the day before I went to go get my uniform we decided to home school.

A typical day:

A great day I wake up at 6:00. A good day 7:00. An average day 9:00. If there's time I go for a run, and then come back, feed the guinea pigs, eat breakfast, etc. But as it is I sleep in, and sometimes I end up having to cut the exercise.

We start school at 10:00 and go until 3:00. I do five to six subjects per day, and the two mandatory things are math and my online writing class, Brave Writer. My dad usually does work with me until about 2:00, and then that last hour I use to study, or finish things up.

At three my school day is done, and I move on to chores. After that I'm done for the day.


Socialization

I don't think people label home schoolers as un-socialized as much these days. Probably because home schooling is very common, especially where I live. And I remember reading "Yeah there are shy and social awkward home schoolers, but there are also shy and socially awkward public schoolers." I honestly think it depends on your persona. For instance, I see many people throughout the week, but I'm naturally introverted so I'm okay with not being with people all the time. But that's not because of home schooling, I've been that way my entire life. Some home schoolers may be bubbly and outgoing, in which case they would arrange for more social time. It's completely flexible to your personality.

Socializing for me includes sports practices every night of the week, and then getting together with friends on the weekend. So that leaves just the school day and maybe Sunday for me to not be with people, and that's alright with me. Again, it depends on your personality.


What will you do for high school?

If I had a penny for every time someone asked me if I was gonna home school through high school I'd be rich.:) My diplomatic answer is "Probably for freshman year, then I don't know what I'm gonna do." And that's the truth. I really like home schooling, but I've given much thought to going to school for the community (things like student government, after school activities, etc). But going to school would mean a radical lifestyle shift for me, and I don't think I'm quite ready to give it up. Yes, I'll probably home school for my freshman year, but maybe I'll do an online school. Or maybe I will go to a school after all! I don't really know the answer yet. We've decided to just take it year by year.




What's your favorite thing about home schooling?

Definitely the freedom. Yes, I think that every home schooler says that, but it's a spectacular thing. To be able to wear crazy eye shadow or read outside or take a five minute break is really wonderful. That, and I don't have to commute more than a walk downstairs to get to school (I don't do well in cars).

There's my typical day, although I forgot to mention Tuesday's, which are our "out of the house" days. I go to piano and read to kids at my old school, and we usually go out for lunch. Those days I do a little school in the morning, but then we leave at about 12:30. If you have any questions, or want to share your home schooling experience I'd love to hear!




Thank you Golden so much for having me today, it was a pleasure!


I'm Emily Rose - writer, photographer, soccer, basketball, and softball player, and keeper of Mist of the Blossom Rain. I up and left the city, and now reside in a rural part of New England with my parents, chocolate lab, and three guinea pigs. 

56 comments:

Joshua said...

I'd love to be able to home school my kids. Unfortunately, I think The Girl would kill me and The Boy wouldn't care.

Miss Emily K. said...
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Budd said...

thanks for that insightful look at a day in the life. I have thought about homeschooling my kids, but my wife would do a majority of it and I can't really see her having the patience for it.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi GE and Emily Rose - interesting .. yours certainly seems to be working out, and I blog with another family - the mother teaches and she appears to be fine and knowledgeable - but I do know one family who can't spell and get facts wrong .. it worries me .. but I admire you all ... cheers Hilary

Tyrean Martinson said...

Emily - nice, insightful guest post! I homeschool my kids, or should I say they homeschool and I supervise? Either way, your week sounds a lot like our week. Every year is a little different, and every year we tackle the question of school next year? or the year after that? or running start? or? The freedom to choose, and the moments we have to just enjoy learning are the reasons we keep homeschooling.

Stephen Tremp said...

Its great to meet you Emily and thanks for sharing a day in your life with us. I'm all for home schooling. I'd do it with my kids but we have crazy schedules so for now they are in a public school.

....Petty Witter said...

A fascinating post. Home schooling isn't at all common here in England - Official figures as to how many are home schooled are difficult to find but a rough government guess-timate seems to suggest between.7,400 and 34,400.

Connie Keller said...

I homeschooled my four kids from kindergarten through high school. Two are juniors in college and applying to grad schools. One in chemistry and the other in math. Child three is graduating from high school and plans to study engineering in college. And number four is a sophomore in high school. We have all loved it. (The kids in college are especially thankful when they hear horror stories from their friends about high school.)

As for socialization, piano, fencing, air soft, robotics, summer Shakespeare plays, etc. Yeah, they had plenty of friends.

I'm really going to miss it when the last one goes to college.

Old Kitty said...

Thank you Emily for such an insightful and enlightening look on your day as a home-schooled student!! It definitely sounds as if it's worked out wonderfully for you! Yay!! Now the world is truly your oyster! take care
x

Belle said...

Great post! I think home schooling is wonderful and it was interesting to hear how you handle it. My granddaughter is home schooled because of mental problems and she is doing well.

Rachna Chhabria said...
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Rachna Chhabria said...

Hi Emily, nice to meet you. Thanks for sharing this post about home schooling, I used to always wonder what actually home school entitled.

S.P. Bowers said...

I loved hearing how home schooling is working for you. I don't think I would have had the discipline as a youth to do it. I would have learned a lot about some things. Others not so much. Plus I'm one of the shy ones. School was important for me in more ways than schooling. I never would have left the house otherwise.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

If you enjoy it, stay with it. I've always heard home-schooled kids tend to be a lot smarter and you are definitely proof of that, Golden.

Carrie Butler said...

Very interesting. :) Thanks for sharing your experience with us!

Heather said...

It was nice to meet Emily and learn more about homeschooling. I have cousins who home school and they swear by it.

M Pax said...

Homeschooling through middle school would have been great. HS was better.

Waving at Eagle & Emily

Beth said...

I started home schooling myself in high school. My classes were on a cd-rom.I was in a hurry to graduate and bail so I did one class at a time until it was done starting with English and history, because I could do a whole semester of those things in a matter of weeks. I left Math for last b/c I knew I would have to study for that one. Anyway, I graduated and bailed.

Sam said...

Hey, I'm in my Senior year of high school and I'v been homeschooling sense 8th grade. Once I became a freshman however I started taking a couple classes at the local public school. I live in a small town, so there is only one. lol I enjoy it because I get a little bit of both worlds. I have my classes at home and then I get to go to the high school for an hour. It's nice as far as socializing :)

sam*

Kimberlee Turley said...

Parents who home school are saints! I can't ever see myself being so selfless that I'd give up all my free time like that.

Rusty Webb said...

Home schooling can be awesome. Folks that are disciplined and have parents who are involved can get further than kids at traditional schools probably can. I'm glad it's been working out for you.

Pat Hatt said...

Can't even fathom how some home school, it must take a lot of effort. Sounds like a great exeperience though and yeah I'll take the introvert way too as that's what I've always been like.

Christine Rains said...

Interesting and informative post. Thank you.

KarenG said...

I homeschooled my kids on and off. Not all of them, just when one or two had bad experiences, or wanted to skip a grade or some such thing. It was always a beneficial thing, for them and me too. My daughter left high school at 15, homeschooled for a year, then worked a year, then enrolled in the community college. She graduated from that and then enrolled in a state college and got her bachelors. It was always interesting to hear people's comments about it. Everyone has their prejudices. Personally, I think it's a fabulous option and doesn't take the time that one might think. We got more done in 2 hours at home than happened in a whole day at school.

MyTricksterGod said...

This home-schooling business always fascinates me.
I think I already told you, but my idea of home-school was genuinely an idea of a parent bent on indoctrinating their child with some ideology that either isn't taught in school or goes against popular conception.

Even though this is my second peek in the life of a home-schooler, I can confidently look back at my teen life and confidently say that one-- and only ONE science would dominate my home-schooling curriculum.
VideoGameology 101.
At least until my mama whooped my butt to put in some work for a few ten minutes or so.

Anyway... I ultimately turned out fine the way I am now.

Anyway... Kudos young home-schoolee, much you have to learn young masta.

Rek said...
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Rek said...

Hi, Emily and Eagle (I would so love to know your name someday).
An insightful look into homeschooling.
Here, in India and goes for most of Asia, it barely exists. One really needs public/private school credentials for college admissions and beyond.
It's true, that part, of being introverted irrespective of the kind of schooling. I am proof enough.
But I don't think many kids can handle the self monitoring and discipline aspect.
Good luck to you both.

Jamie Gibbs said...

It sounds like a blast. I can't think of many people near me who've been homeschooled - it's not a common thing in the dark wilds of Wales :)

I love the variety that you get though, sounds a hell of a lot nicer than classes crammed full of people reading from books all day!

Nathan said...

Home schooling is really common? I actually never would have guessed that. I just kinda assumed everyone went to school... Although I did know one person who was home schooled growing up.

Madeleine Maddocks said...

Loved this account of your teenage routine Emily Rose.
So different to my teen years. It sounds like you enjoyed it and have achieved much in those years.

Humpty Dumpty said...

Thanks for sharing your story, Emily. As you said, the social aspect of homeschooling isn't really an issue as long as the teacher provides ample opportunity to socialize. I used to worry about my niece and nephew when my brother's wife decided to home school, but because they live in the country there are many others who were homeschooling. They all used to get together once a week. They also had access to a school gym in the area once a week. In addition, they were very active in their church so they had lots of opportunities to make friends and socialize. My daughter asked me to homeschool her when she was having trouble with classmates, but I had a hard enough time getting her to do her homework at that point, so decided it wouldn't work. :)

Stuart Nager said...

Just the sound of the freedom from educational constraints...ahh. You do have to be dedicated, and it sounds like you are. Good for you (both).

Susan Roebuck said...

I envy you the freedom of home schooling which sounds a fabulous technique. It's not at all common in the UK or in the rest of Europe but I think it should be. It offers an alternative which would suit many many people. It's good to see that you do get out and socialise because that's so important. Good luck with your future.

Sarah Pearson said...

This was really interesting. I would have loved to have home-schooled my two, but I didn't feel confident enough. Although it isn't common here in England, I think it is becoming more popular as more and more issues are becoming obvious within our school system.

Michael Offutt, Tebow Cult Initiate said...

I can't imagine being home-schooled. But I guess the world is changing. If you'd asked me about people working from home when I was your age (the eighties-yes I am that old) I would have said...no way. Yet here it is in 2012 and people are telecommuting.

Traci Kenworth said...

I'm thinking about homeschooling my kids. Are the textbooks expensive for it? I got a flyer in the mail saying you could do online homeschooling for k-12 now here. My question is does the degree you get for it count the same as one from a highschool? Or are you entering college/military/tech school at a disadvantage, do you think?

anthony stemke said...

Home schooling is great, I've seen it with my own eyes. My spouse is a tutor for home schoolers whose parents cannot teach math and sometimes English. Home schooled people always do better on SAT tests. EVERYONE should seriously consider home schooling their children.
As for social aspect,Miss Rose is right, if you are shy you could be public schooled or home schooled.
Great post Golden E.

Ciara said...

I want to home school my kids, but I'm not sure I'm smart enough. My middle son is like a math genius. I'm so not ready for him to figure a problem out faster than I can.

michelle said...

This was really interesting...
I don't think that home-schooling is common here in South Africa.

Over the past few weeks, I've read other posts on this topic and it seems that there are lots of pre-conceptions as well as misconceptions on the subject. I think that it has its pros and cons, just like the public school system...

The Golden Eagle said...

Joshua: That's too bad. I really like it.

Budd: Sometimes I wonder if my mom would prefer just letting other teachers take care of things; it does take up time. :P

Hilary: I'm lucky in that my mom used to be a teacher, so she knows how to get information across.

Tyrean: Same here. :)

Stephen: Yeah, homeschooling probably wouldn't fit in with a busy household.

Petty Witter: Interesting that it's less common in England. I wonder what the cultural reason for that is . . .

Connie: Now there's a homeschooling success story!

Old Kitty: It does sound like it's working well for Emily. :)

Belle: The diversity that homeschooling allows is great.

Rachna: It's a bit more hidden than public school.

S.P.: I'm introverted (and a bit shy), so I know what you mean; sometimes it feels like it would be easier to stay home.

Alex: Aw, thank you. :)

Carrie: Thanks for coming by!

Heather: It depends on who is doing the homeschooling; for some people it works, and others it probably would not be the best idea.

M: *waves back* :)

Beth: The ability to learn what you wanted and when you wanted must have been nice.

Sam: That sounds like this town; there's only one high school. :P

Kimberlee: It does take time.

Rusty: It's just my experience, but that does seem to be true. Or a mix of progresses in different areas.

Pat: I'm introverted, too.

Christine: Thanks for reading. :)

The Golden Eagle said...

Karen: It sounds like it worked out well for her!

And it is easy to learn a lot in only a couple hours at home. :)

MyTricksterGod: I wouldn't say my mom is that against the tide--or many other parents, for that matter. Some homeschoolers are homeschooled because their parents would prefer to keep their children away from other students, but that's certainly not everyone. :P

Rek: Once I'm a famous published author I'll let you all know. ;) Okay, just kidding. But publication would probably cause me to mention my name . . .

A lot of colleges in the USA seem to accept homeschooling credentials; it's too bad they don't in Asian countries.

Thanks. :)

Jamie: LOL. It is. Though I do like reading from books. ;)

Nathan: More common in some areas, but I would agree with Emily--in the places we've lived, there have been at least a few homeschoolers.

Madeleine: It does sound like it's going well for her. :)

Humpty Dumpty: There is a different element of pressure in homeschooling; you could say it feels more relaxed if work doesn't get done because it all takes place at home, though it really isn't different from public school homework.

Stuart: Thank you. :)

Susan: That's the main point of homeschooling, if you ask me--it works for some people.

Sarah: It would be nice if public schools were all wonderful . . . but of course, that's not going to happen.

Michael: Yup!

Traci: I can't speak for Emily, of course, but in my experience, the textbook price varies depending on what you get. My mom doesn't follow any set curriculum and just gets books that sound good in whatever subject I'm studying.

As for degrees, homeschoolers usually go through the same tests as regular high school attendees. I'm planning to take the SAT/SAT Subject Tests later on and might end up taking other standardized ones as well.

I know at least some colleges are open to taking homeschoolers. My dance teacher said when her son applied for college, they accepted him because he was homeschooled.

Anthony: It was all Emily, here. :) Glad you liked the post, though!

Ciara: I'm sure you're smart enough!

Michelle: I agree. Homeschooling has its problems, of course.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I'm a high school teacher and I've had home schooled students who started public school during their high schol years and all of them did great in every part of the environment. I've also coached students who were homeschooled but still participated in sports or musicals. Again they do great. There are lots of opportunities either way. Our school is doing some hybrid stuff where you can do some of each, cyber school and traditional. It works. Good luck with your decision.

Liz said...

Very interesting post. I have wondered what it was like to be home schooled from time to time. Now I have a little more information. Thanks.

laughingwolf said...

emily rose, ican`t see you having many problems... already you are bright and articulate... kudos to all :)

ge, thx for the glimpse as to what`s happening in one situation...

Jay Noel said...

Thinking about homeschooling our kids. My oldest is interested, as he's bored at school. He's in the gifted program, but that's only one day a week.

I'm talking with other parents that homeschool now to get a better idea. Luckily, I was a teacher.

Pearson Report said...

What a delightful and interesting post, Emily Rose!

Thank you Eagle for sharing your blog, today, with Emily Rose - home schooling has always fascinated me - there is a lot to consider.

Cheers, Jenny @ Pearson Report
Co-Host of the Blogging from A to Z Challenge.

Clarissa Draper said...

Golden, I thought you were talking about yourself. But what a cool guest post. I home school my son and it was one of the best decisions I made. He wasn't succeeding at school because the teachers didn't have time to work with him. Now I'm able to explain the subjects to him (although, I really have to keep up with the maths because I can't explain what I don't understand!).

Sangu Mandanna said...

I'd have loved to be home schooled just to be able to wake up at 9am some days! That said, I would have missed the social aspect, which was always my favourite part of school.

The Golden Eagle said...

Susan: I wish the school district around here let homeschoolers participate in their programs. I'm pretty sure they don't--though since I'm homeschooled because the district isn't so great, I guess it doesn't really matter. :P

Liz: Glad you found it informative!

Laughingwolf: You're welcome! :)

Jay: I do think being a teacher helps; though that's not to say parents who weren't don't make good educators.

Jenny: Anytime!

Clarissa: Nope, not me. ;)

It sounds like it's working out well for you both!

Sangu: LOL. Yeah, getting up late can be nice--though I'm a morning person and rise early anyway. :P

Deniz Bevan said...

I'm interested in that Turkish March...

Deniz Bevan said...

I'm interested in that Turkish March...

linda said...

I was homeschooled in my sophomore year of high school. I thought it was fun, but it drove my mom nuts and she sent my sister and me back to public school the next year, lol. I remember lots of reading, outings, and violin/piano practicing...

Josh Hoyt said...

I think that home schooling is a great way to go if you are dedicated to learning. It sounds like you have a great schedule and that you stick to it.

The Golden Eagle said...

Deniz: I was, too, when I first read her guest post! :)

Linda: LOL. That sounds like my homeschool right now . . .

Josh: It does sound like it's working out for Emily!

Krispy said...

This was very interesting! I've always been kind of curious as to what homeschooling was like and how you would structure the day. I've always gone to school, so homeschooling has always been something of a mystery to me. Thanks for sharing this!

The Golden Eagle said...

Krispy: Thanks for coming by! :)